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Villa The Circle

This graceful building was built in the Belle Époque for the very select Jockey club of Paris. It is then a place full of life, animated by receptions where all Paris and the celebrities of passage hurry. The Circle accompanies the birth of the city which emerged from the sands from 1860, barely thirteen years before the construction of this building.

Villa le Cercle, exteriorBld Cornuché facade © Center International de Deauville
On the rue Jacques Le Marois side © Center International de Deauville
Interior living rooms © Sandrine Boyer-Engel

INSPIRATIONS
Between the casino and the Royal Hotel, stretch the brick facades of the Circle, designed in 1873 by Desle-François Breney, also author of the urban plan of Deauville. When the order came to him, Breney was inspired by the Hôtel de Salm. A private mansion near the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, which in 1804 became the Musée de la Légion d'Honneur. This same hotel in Salm had also won over Thomas Jefferson when he was United States Ambassador to France and inspired the design of the White House.

This Club is the summer annex of the Jockey Club of Paris (created in 1836). On the principle of English clubs, it aims to bring together men who share the same passion for the horse.

In 2000, noting the dilapidated state of the building, occupied only one month a year, the president of the Circle signed an agreement with the City of de Deauville. This financed the restoration of the place in exchange for the possibility of disposing of it for eleven months a year. The Circle is today a place of cultural, economic and social meetings. It is open for hire for private events.

 

Lounges behind the Circle © Sandrine Boyer- Engel
Entrance © Sandrine Boyer Engel
Interior living rooms © Sandrine Boyer-Engel

Meeting place

See the commercial site

CHARACTER TRAITS
The Circle is characteristic of Napoleon III architecture with:
- A flat roof terrace,
- Large bay windows interspersed with colonnades
- An arcuate rotunda
- Openings surmounted by niches decorated with terracotta busts.
The construction is made of red bricks from the Croix Sonnet brickyard and yellow bricks from the Touques brickyard, materials that were also used for the construction of the Saint Augustin Church.

 

Like 555 villas in Deauville, the Circle is listed in the Area of ​​Development of Architecture and Heritage (AVAP) of Deauville.

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