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Suzy Solidor

Singer

Famous, very famous, then forgotten

Model, then model of the greatest painters, singer, cabaret patron, then antique dealer,… Famous, very famous, then forgotten, Suzy Solidor (1900-1983), deeply marked painting, song and the Deauvillaise chronicle of the 30s An emancipated woman, she rubbed shoulders with the greatest artists of the XNUMXth century.

Born bastard and poor, in 1900, in Brittany, Suzanne Rocher will become at 20: Suzy Solidor, famous boy from the interwar period. Of singular beauty, she is in turn, model, then model for more than 200 painters including: Tamara de Lempicka, Foujita, Marie Laurencin, Man Ray, Van Dongen and Francis Bacon.

La Linen haired girl, fascinates and inspires painters, poets and women who love women. It was in Deauville where she went regularly from 1919 that Suzy Solidor went on stage for the first time. In July 1929 she made her debut in song, at the cabaret Brummel's which was on the back of the current Hermès store.

Famous singer of the 30s, first TV singer in 1935, she opened her cabaret three years earlier in Paris Parisian life. We meet Cocteau, Colette, Churchill, Kessel and Mermoz who falls madly in love with it.

In 1938 she sang her biggest success: Stopover (The sky is blue, the sea is green, leave the window open a little…) before creating in 1942 the French version of Lily Marlene.

Léo Pol, composer of Galley (and father of Michel Polnareff) is his pianist. She gives one of her first engagements to Charles Trénet and discovers Marguerite Monnot, who will also accompany him on the piano and of which she sings, in 1936, my legionary.

She is one of the first performers to sing The umbrella by Georges Brassens and inspired Georges Moustaki when he wrote Milord for Edith Piaf.

Her last tour in 1952 will bring her back in July to the Deauville casino scene.

Until 1961 it will animate, in summer, the Deauville nights of the cabaret Brummel's.

PhN

Beyond a singer it is an incomparable monument.

Nothing Looks Like It Looked Like Suzy Solidor

Jean-François Kahn

My travel book