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Meet a Cornmaker

Horse, pelican, fabulous animal, pine cone…. in earthenware or stoneware, the finials adorn the roofs of many buildings and houses. A centuries-old craft tradition, these pieces of art and history were once used to seal the traditional roof structure by covering and protecting the protruding part. Over time, they have become decorative and more artistic. They are distinguished by the variety of their motifs: fauna, flora, allegories ...

2 potteries still make them today

La Poterie du Mesnil de Bavent, entry into the world of potters

At the Poterie du Mesnil de Bavent, the finials have been made since 1842. Everything here is done by hand. Only the ovens have changed. The artist painter and sculptor Martine Kay-Mouat bought pottery in 1987, where she had done her apprenticeship, and with her daughter Dominique relaunched the manufacture of finials, abandoned since the Second World War. The pottery of Mesnil de Bavent has since been one of the few to produce faience and sandstone finials in the pure tradition.
Enter the world of potters ... pottery is open to the public and guided tours, workshops and exhibitions are organized throughout the year.
 
Perseverance rewarded!
In 2007, pottery was labeled "Entreprise du Patrimoine Vivant" and its know-how has been included in the Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage in France since 2008
 

Pottery of Mesnil de Bavent

Place called "Le Mesnil"
Route de Caen - Cabourg RD513
14860 BAVENT
France
+02 31 84 82 41 XNUMX
+06 72 94 27 59 XNUMX

Tony Mauger, the ceramic craftsman specializing in finials

Tony Mauger works as a ceramic potter in Touques in the arts district, which brings together several craftsmen. In internship at the Pottery of Bavent, where his mother worked as a ceramist, he quickly showed his dispositions for this craft and stayed there for five years. After a brief cinematographic break to take care of Jacques Perrin's birds on the set of "Migrating People", he decides to resume training as a turner and then an enameller. With his diploma in hand, he decided to take to the road to refine his know-how and fully master the various techniques from the potters of France. He moved to Normandy in 2005, bought twenty tonnes of mussels, the oldest of which are nearly 200 years old, and has since continued the tradition of sandstone finials.

Also meet the ceramic artisans