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Douglas Kennedy

Writer

Member of the jury for the 42nd American Film Festival

Born in Manhattan in 1955, he grew up on the Upper West Side, studied at the Collegiate School (the oldest high school in New York), at Bowdoin College (Maine), before leaving for Trinity College Dublin in 1974. Back in New York, he worked as a stage manager in second-rate Broadway theaters, before deciding, in 1977, to go back to Dublin for a few months… Forty years later, he still lives on this side of the Atlantic.

In Dublin, he became co-founder of a theater company and then joined the National Theater of Ireland as administrator of the experimental branch. He spent five years there (1978-1983), during which he began to write, at night. In 1980, he sold his first piece to BBC Radio 4, who ordered two more. In 1983, he resigned to devote himself exclusively to writing. He became a freelance journalist, notably for the Irish Times where he ran a column from 1984 to 1986, then moved to London in 1988, when his first book - a travelogue in Egypt - was published and his career freelance journalist is also booming. In 1994, released his first novel Dead-end, brought to the screen in 1997 by Stephan Elliott under the title Welcome to Woop Woop. His second novel, The man who wanted to live his life, was an international success (it was also adapted to the cinema in 2010 by director Éric Lartigau), the first of a long series of literary successes with critics and the public alike.

Translated into 22 languages ​​and living between Maine, Montreal, London, Paris and Berlin, he is now one of the favorite authors of the French, with nearly 7 million copies sold in France for all of his titles. , many of which have been or are in the process of being adapted for cinema.

My travel book