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TSUGOUHARU FOUJITA

Painter

The beloved painter of the Roaring Twenties

Unknown in Paris in 1913, when he arrived from Japan, Foujita quickly became a figure of Montparnasse and met success in 1921 with female nudes which became the central motif of his work ... alongside his passion for cats, which he drew like no other. Dandy and seductive, he is with Van Dongen and Raoul Dufy, one of the painters adored by the Deauville of the Roaring Twenties that he discovered in 1925 (and will frequent the summer until 1928). He was invited there with his wife Youki: “I was invited to Deauville with Mistinguett and others to the Normandy hotel. I was offered to stay there as long as I wanted and to have the finest lunches and dinners served. The room was not bad either. The reason was that my presence would bring more people together on the beach. I am slandered for having been an advertising object; but it doesn't matter, because in my opinion there is no valid reason for it ”.

Foujita knew very early on how to seduce and use cinematographic news, Pathé or Gaumont, the new major media of the time for his notoriety. He appears there alongside fashionable personalities: Mistinguett takes him with her to the racetracks, Kiki de Montparnasse poses for him,… On the beach and on the boards, photographers ask him. Very cooperative, he cuts through the waves alongside Suzy Solidor and cartoonist Marcel Vertés. Another day, he dons a jersey covered with playing cards while Suzy Solidor appears, dressed in a fishing net weighted with small rectangles of cork.
In his memories Forty years of life in Deauville (Fasquelle-1952) Michel Georges Michel, famous columnist from Deauville recounts:… “… earrings in the nose, naturally reddened lips, he walks on his hands to gain his place at the Bar du Soleil or even wears Mistinguett on his shoulders to make him take his Cinzano. There is no party without him. We invite him everywhere and he refuses. His Villa is the most beautiful, his wife too. Her car is as big as Picasso's, which crosses Deauville without turning around any more than Miss Yvonne Georges when she sings. ”

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